Church Edition Volume 8: My Favorite Highlights

Oh happy day! Our latest volume of What’s in the Bible? curriculum is available today–Volume 8: Words to Make Us  Wise {Psalms, Proverbs & The Writings}.

I wrote this post back in february while in the middle of writing this volume of curriculum, and today I’m even more mindful that teaching context to children is critically important.

The highlights of volume 8 {for me}:

Job: While sharing the story of Job, we included a quiet time of discussion for children to discuss trusting God during bad times. It was important that we helped children know that the book of Job is a wisdom book, which means that from Job’s story we learn to trust God’s wisdom. Encouraging children to understand the context and type of book enabled us to write a lesson that didn’t question God’s fairness, but instead trust His wisdom.

Psalms: We included an activity that identified the various types of psalms and after learning about the types, children will have the opportunity to create their very own psalm. I’m absolutely dying to see the psalms the children will create when given the opportunity. Will you do me a favor? Would you email me {} with a few of the psalms your children create? It would mean so much to me. Thank you!

Proverbs: Man oh man–so many highlights in this lesson! I love, love, love that we highlight the difference between being smart vs wise by giving children scenarios and encouraging them to determine if the person must act smart or wise. Oh! and, probably my most favorite section of this entire volume is the principle vs promise activity. We teach children that proverbs are not promises but principles and lead them to determine the principles in various proverbs. C’mon! Now that’s just good.

Ecclesiastes & Song of Solomon: We focus the majority of content around Ecclesiastes and reviewing the writings books, and not much time at all unpacking the book Song of Solomon {phew!}. Because Ecclesiastes means “the preacher” we wrote an activity in which children create their own sermon and then “preach” it to the rest of the small group. They can even dress up like their pastor if they like. What’s more fun than this?

Bonus! We’ve included a Proverbs family calendar for an at-home activity.

Pick up your copy today–don’t forget free shipping is included for purchases over $15. If you’re interested in testing the waters, you can order a single week of curriculum and see what you think.

Cheers to teaching kids the bible!

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Great show. May I throw a couple of tidbits you may find interesting? 1. They used poetry a lot because it is easier to memorize. Books were hand written and therefore hideously expensive. 2. Seconding sequences have an advantage over other styles of poetry - they are easy to translate. That could explain why God wanted the people of the ancient middle east, such as the Israelites, to use that style of poetry rather than any other.