Voices: How Does Your Family Handle Halloween?

Halloween Front Door Decorations

Halloween is a tricky subject! Christian families all over the world handle it differently – many abstain from the festivities entirely, some take their little ones trick-or-treating, while others come up with their own alternatives. In this ‘Voices’ post, we’ve gathered an amazing group of parents and bloggers and asked them to share how they treat Halloween in their families! Read their thoughtful responses below:

“What am I trying to teach my kids, by the decisions I make as a parent?” “What is more important, being socially accepted or following a conviction?” “Which is more important to teach, the difference between right and wrong or what is fact vs. fiction?”

 

I think more than ever, we as parents and church leaders need to start asking ourselves which of the questions above better prepares our kids for life.  What is a more important lesson for your kids? What is right and wrong? Or, what is fact or fiction? Our kids don’t have a problem knowing right from wrong. They can learn that at school, on TV, with your rules, and definitely at the church. What I want us to consider is what we are doing to separate fact from fiction, truth from lies, and reality from fantasy.

 

I’d argue that teaching a child that Santa Claus is real is a riskier parenting tactic than dressing them up as a zombie on October 31st.

 

Why? Because I believe that it is more important for my kids to know the difference between a real Jesus and a fictional Iron Man, or a Santa Claus that doesn’t actually know they are bad or good and doesn’t come down the chimney. These teachings, along with the Tooth Fairy and the Easter Bunny (don’t get me started) have a real risk of causing our kids to wonder if Jesus is fake once they realize the other ones are. I want my kids to know that there was a real David and not a real Ron Weasley; a real Jonah and not a real Gandalf the Grey. My wife and I have decided to draw a clear line in the sand for our children regarding fiction and reality. So, when our children first began to understand Santa we quickly diffused their belief. Same thing with Harry Potter (even though we watch them) and all the other fantasy characters. For us, rooting our children in truth trumps worrying they will follow the devil if they dress like Mickey Mouse and ask for candy on October 31st.

– JT Witcher, Kids Director at Crosspoint Community Church, Nashville, TN


If Halloween were just costumes and candy, our family would be all over it. However, even the decorations at Target show the darker underbelly of the season. We have decided to just make Halloween no big deal. Throughout the years, we’ve gone trick-or-treating in the daylight at my aunt’s house, we’ve been to the zoo, we’ve stayed home with the lights off, we’ve been to a church’s fall festival. Overall, we just want to make it a non-issue, not a part of our big family traditions, keep it low-key and not a “thing” for us. It’s served us well because it helps our kids see where our priorities are – we decorate and do it up for Christmas and Easter. Not Halloween.

– Amanda, blogger at ohamanda.com


Growing up, our family went from one extreme to the other on how we celebrated Halloween. With our own family to think about now, my husband and I have changed our opinions on a few things over the years, but the overall thought is the same – we want Christ to be the center of whatever we do. We participate in a fall festival at our church, but don’t go gather candy from neighbors. We do carve pumpkins, but we always do one that is based on the book Let’s Shine Jesus Light on Halloween and The Pumpkin Patch Parable, and focus on what the light of Jesus and what He has done for us. We can’t avoid all the decorations that we see in the weeks leading up to Halloween, but we can talk about the scary things together. As believers we can still share and be the light of Christ during a holiday that is focused on darkness.

– Jolanthe, blogger at homeschoolcreations.net


Our family has made the decision to not participate in traditional Halloween activities. Our oldest turns 10 (this week!) and since becoming parents, we have probably done costumes and trick-or-treating 2-3 times. In our experience it has been more frustrating than family bonding. We have had little ones scared of the garish costumes that they have seen or there has been the neighbor that has costumed their child in a manner that we are uncomfortable with. I have a couple girls that are sensitive to things they see and it has just been in our better interest to find alternative plans for the evening. Last year, Halloween fell on a Wednesday and we participated in a costumed Awana night at our church which we enjoyed. This year, our plans look like they will include a fun movie (on a school night!), letting the kids pick out a favorite bag of candy and pooling our choices at home, and fun take-out food while we watch our movie. Truly, this has been something that I wrestle with every fall and the decision is different for every family.

– Stephanie Shepherd, blogger at Simple Things


Halloween has always been a really fun holiday in our household. Both my husband and I grew up in families that participated in trick or treating, decorating the house, and passing out candy to the neighborhood kids. My own kids have always dressed up, and have really looked forward to planning out their costumes from the first week in October.

Usually their costume choices fall in alignment with whatever their favorite movie or character is at the time. As an example, my oldest has been Buzz Lightyear, and Indiana Jones. My youngest has been Dash from the Incredibles, Zorro and a Ghost Buster. It’s make believe, and it’s fun.I do decorate my house for fall, starting in September and have decorations up until Thanksgiving.. I have a collected assortment of pumpkins (some jack o’lanterns) and fall flowers, and autumn colored table linens and towels. We have a few scarecrows that we put in the flowerbeds, and my husband and sons decorate the front yard and porch a bit closer to Halloween night. Attending Catholic schools most of my life, we were encouraged to dress as one of the saints during our annual Halloween parade, which of course fell the day before All Saints Day. Some people did, and some dressed instead as gypsies, clowns, hobos, or in “old fashioned” 1950’s or 60’s clothes—borrowed from our parent’s closets.

I realize that there are people in the church who whole-heartedly disagree with any sort of Halloween celebration, and I can respect their point of view on this. Personally, we have just never found what we do to be anything other than a fun time for the kids, not to mention it being a great excuse to buy several bags of yummy candy!

– Lisa Strnad, blogger at talkinglikeagirl.com


We approach Halloween with our kiddos by not making it a big deal. We choose not to celebrate it, but we do engage in fun fall activities where our children still have the opportunity to dress up and get some candy! We do this by heading out to Harvest festivities in our area.

Of course, the subject of Halloween and why we don’t celebrate it comes up because we are surrounded by it and many of our friends celebrate it. We tell our children that every family makes their own choices, and our family is convicted to not participate in a holiday that, at its’ core, is a celebration of fear. You need only to look around to see the skulls and the blood and the witches and the darkness. It is a holiday designed to engage our fears, our worst fears, and for many it is a night of wicked happenings. For kids, Halloween can be particularly scary, and we don’t want to put fear into our children. With that said, we are not interested in judging the convictions or beliefs of other families. We tell our children that not celebrating Halloween is how we believe God has led our family, and therefore we go with it.

Will our convictions change over time? Perhaps. Will we decide to light up our house on Halloween and give out the best treats to the sweet kiddos who come knocking or will we go dark? Honestly, I don’t know. We’re in process of figuring all that out. But our goal, our ultimate goal, is to be a light and to make decisions based on faith, not fear. And each family must go before the Lord and make those decisions. Whatever your family chooses, however you are convicted, go forth in confidence! We are God’s holy and chosen people, so walk free and shine!

– Sarah Mae, blogger at sarahmae.com


Halloween is received with open arms in our household. Each year we accept the challenge to create our evening attire from items located in our home. I don’t consider myself the creative one under our roof, but together we can create some nifty ideas.

Trick-or-treating varies from year to year, some years I’ve remained at home with the youngest to pass out candy, others years we walk the neighborhood together and hand off our wares to the next door neighbor to pass out from their driveway. Some years we like to attach a verse to our goodies with Psalms 38:8 – Taste and see that the Lord is good – other years we don’t include a verse. What we enjoy most about this annual family event is visiting with many of our neighbors. We linger at campfires and hot dogs roasts, coffee and hot chocolate are sometimes offered, and the delightful “ooos” and “ahhhs” of costume admirers can be heard at each stop. At the end of the evening, we thank the Lord for His provisions, we combine them into one big pile, keep a few favorites, and donate the rest to our schools. A picture each years marks time, and every year I thank Him for the gift of the ones who reside in our home.

– Heather Conrad, blogger at heatherlconrad.com


However you handle Halloween, we think this Costume & Candy Kit will be a fun addition to your October. You can even dress up like two of our favorite What’s In The Bible? characters, Buck Denver and Sunday School Lady!

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36 comments
cbkaeg3
cbkaeg3

When I was growing up, Halloween was never really a very big deal.  Some years we went trick or treating only at the homes of a few friends, some years we went around the neighborhood, and some years we didn't go at all.  I remember handing out candy to trick or treaters, but in one place we lived, the kids were afraid to come to our house.  Some years we also participated in costume parties at church or other places.

When my husband and I first got married, we handed out candy to a handful of kids that came to our door.  When our first daughter came along, we took her a couple of years to 2 different houses.  Following years we just decided that allowing our children to go door to door was not what we wanted for them, so we continued to hand out candy and tracts to the neighborhood children who came to our door.  When Halloween falls on Sunday, Wednesday, or another day when we are not home, they know because we don't turn our front light on.  We have always felt that giving out tracts with the candy was a good way to get the Gospel to the neighbors.  Unfortunately, the last time we gave out candy,  I ran out before most of the neighborhood kids could come to the door because people from out of town like to go to the neighborhoods in our town.  I consider this to be selfish on the part of the parents and it has turned me off from wanting to give out any candy.

There was a time when Halloween was cutesie little witches with green faces, ghosts, goblins, & pumpkins.  This year, as I go into the stores, all I see are evil, scary masks and black spiders and bats.  I choose not to emphasize a holiday that supports so much evil.  As with every decision that might seem to set us apart from others, we try to teach our children that not everyone believes the same way we do.  Just because they choose to decorate their houses or dress up and go door to door trick or treating, doesn't make them any less Christians than we are.  We all have to answer to God for our choices, we do not answer for other people.  We do have liberty in Christ, not to sin whenever we want, but to make choices in the standards we set for our families.

AmandaHarrisonCruz
AmandaHarrisonCruz

Wow...I think that the thing that amazed me most were the harsh comments.  "It's pathetic", "you're not a Christian if", etc.  Really?  Christ called us to LOVE.  And while we are supposed to hold one another accountable (as iron sharpens iron) we are not meant to condemn.  If someone has a differing opinion than you, even if you feel they could not possibly be more wrong, speak the Truth in LOVE.

Christ dined with, hung out with, fellowshipped with, and loved on those who were considered the lowest of the low.  And the ones who were "doing everything right" were the ones Jesus had the biggest issues with!

One of the things I teach my children is that there is no scale of sin.  No one kind of sin is greater than any other.  Which translates to:  Calling people names because they celebrate something you don't agree with is JUST AS SINFUL AS the sin you're pointing out in them. 

This is My commandment: that you love one another.  John 15:12

FarmerFriend
FarmerFriend

So we are debating if it's OK or not to celebrate Satan once a year? Are you sure you people are followers of Christ?

Carrine
Carrine

I'm actually pretty passionately against Halloween & my disdain for it grows every year. However, I try very hard not to judge other Christians & pray for them. My kids are young & Halloween was never really an issue until this year. I've told my kids we do not celebrate fear or evil.

Furthermore, chances are you don’t know much about Church history. History is a weak subject for Americans in general – and if you’re not a Christian you probably don’t care about Church history. Shoot, even a large chunk of the Church, people who are Christian’s, don’t care much about Church history.

If I were to ask you what was the big deal about The Reformation and/or who were some “big names” during that period, would you know what I’m talking about? Do you think of some current movement about “being reformed” and automatically assume anyone interested in The Reformation must be a horrible, fire-breathing, 5-Point Calvinist? Or a staunch Lutheran? The Reformation is about far more than Martin Luther or John Calvin. There were other people involved too - do you know who Ulrich Zwingli is? Or William Tyndale? There are countless unsung heroes that sacrificed much during this 130 year period of history. Regrettably, I didn’t have any idea about the extent or consequences of The Reformation until recently… and since I didn’t, I’m figuring you don’t either.

I would submit to you – all Bible believing Christians should celebrate The Reformation. It represents what could be considered the greatest revival of faith and freedom, ever. The courage of the men and women of this period (1517 - 1648), people who stood up to the ever increasing fallacies in the church of the time, risking their jobs, their homes, being imprisoned, tortured, and sentenced to death, sparked one of the most important turning points in world history. The translation of the Bible into common languages subsequently led to one of the greatest eras of social, political, and spiritual freedom the world has known.

Which brings me to the point – did you know there is an actual day to celebrate The Reformation? Reformation day is observed on October 31st as that is the anniversary of the day Martin Luther nailed is 95 Thesis onto the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg, Germany – the event that sparked the beginning of The Reformation.

We all benefit from having the Bible in our own language and the fact that we can easily read and study it without fear. I’m not saying we should idolize any of the Reformers; they were all simply people that struggled with sin every day just like the rest of us. But, I do believe that we should know our history and celebrate the period of The Reformation. So, this is an open invitation to all Christians to investigate, study, learn, grow, teach others, and celebrate Reformation Day on October 31st.

jagrimes
jagrimes

I decorate for fall. I do keep my light on on Oct. 31 and open the door. I try to get to know the people by asking a few questions. Then I give then a little bag that I prepared, filled with Christian color sheets, candy wrapped in scripture & sayings (like don't be an "airhead" trust Jesus, he loves you). I get fun tracts and pencils with John 3:16 on them. I also put my church info in the bag and kids activities. I look past who they may be to see what God wants them to be. After all, THEY come to my door for something, I want to give them Jesus.

KristyStinnette
KristyStinnette

I find it interesting that in all of these opinions there is not one mention of the manipulations of Satan,how real he is and how he can use this Holiday to dissuade us. Obviously Satan is always at work, not just at Halloween, but at Halloween time the doors that people open to Satan are more significant. There was a comment about the Dangers of believing in Santa versus Buz Light Year. We don't celebrate Halloween nor do we encourage the belief of Santa. But we also need to be careful not to underestimate the lengths to which Satan will go to. I'm not saying that we should be fearful, For Christ has overcome, just smart about it. Satan is real and I for one am not going to give him any extra opportunities to mess with me. He has enough already. :) I'm not attacking anyone, you have to do what feels right for you. God Bless!

thechaseplace
thechaseplace

We've prayerfully considered how to treat Halloween throughout our kids' growing up years, and God has led us in different ways.  Three years ago, when our kids were in first, second, and fourth grades, we moved into a new neighborhood in August, and by October we were still wishing we knew our neighbors better.  So many doors stay closed all the time, and if you aren't outside at just the right moment, it can be hard to tell who you live around.  We decided that October 31st was "National Knock on Your Neighbor's Door Day."  We got to meet lots of neighbors that night, and we found several homes with elderly couples who were just thrilled to be visited.  There aren't a lot of kids in our neighborhood--it's definitely not one of those where you have turn off all the lights if you don't want to be bothered--so it really felt nice to be out as a family saying hello to those whose kids were grown and gone.  Since then, our kids have taken to calling Halloween "Knock on Your Neighbor's Door Day," and there's no question anymore about whether celebrating will send them a confusing message.

Mark Helotie
Mark Helotie

So I went and read the page... many many responses, etc. Then the very last thing just blew it all out the window for me: "However you handle Halloween, we think this Costume & Candy Kit will be a fun addition to your October. You can even dress up like two of our favorite What’s In The Bible? characters, Buck Denver and Sunday School Lady!" Thanks for being transparently biased. ... telling us to "dress up"? LOL... wow.

manenough
manenough

It's just pathetic for the so called Christians to participate in the festivities of devil worship.

amberic
amberic

In our family, we agree that Halloween is not something to celebrate, as it is not appear to be a Christian holiday and there are many dark undertones.  The origin of Halloween is still highly debated, this is just our personal family conviction.  We do several different things during this holiday.  We are called to be a "light in the world".  What better way to share the gospel, when people are coming to our door?  There are many great tracts out there to hand out.  One in particular that Answers in Genesis carries, begins with the start of the history of Halloween (kinda neat facts for anyone) and ends in the gospel message.  You can buy these in large quantities inexpensively instead of candy, or include it with a piece of candy.  What a great way to teach our children to reach out and talk with people...in the comfort of our own home....and your able to turn off the lights when it is bedtime and feel good about being a light in your neighborhood showing love to your neighbors.  You're a light that shines in your neighborhood, and what better way to show them love?

We have more ideas that our family enjoys on our website www.sortingthroughthenoise.com.  I hope our site is helpful.  Just don't want to type everything out again that is in our family blog.

MariaAguilar1
MariaAguilar1

I believe that we are in this world but we are not to conform to it, I mean research Halloween and see if it is something worth celebrating. It is a pagan holiday and has nothing to do with Christ. We are called to think and pursue Godly things. Philippians 4:8. How does celebrating Halloween fall into this category? As parents the fact that we don't celebrate Halloween (because of what we believe and know) helps us show our kids that they don't have to be like everyone else and to stand up for what they know is right even if that means going against the crowd. We tell our kids don't do bad things even if everyone else is doing it. So how can you say this to your kid and be doing it yourself? Like I said everyone is free to do what they feel is right but that doesn't make it right.

lvkimble
lvkimble

I struggle every year with this!  I have many friends who are strong believers and Christ-followers that participate, and I in no way think they'll stand before God and hear Him say "Well done, good and faithful servant...except for that whole Halloween business."  But I do not feel the freedom to participate with my family.  I keep going back to 1 John where it says that God is light and in Him there is no darkness.  Halloween is ALL darkness.  So as much as I want to cave because I see my friends participating with no problems, we just don't.  I tell my kindergartner that we don't think it's fun or funny to celebrate scary things.  I also tell her that each kid should listen to their parents and whatever their parents tell them to do is the right thing. 

heatherhandloff
heatherhandloff

Our kids are still too little (3 and 1) to care much, but we have tried to use it as a time to focus on blessing people in our neighborhood, praying for them, and sharing good news as much as we can.  Looking back I wish we had been braver about the latter, of course!  One year we had high-protein granola bars on hand, for anyone but especially for the parents, as well as all different kinds of candy, and little gospels of John with the plan of salvation inside the front (from pocketpower.org) .  Not many people came so we ended up walking around our neighborhood, meeting people and handing our stuff out as appropriate.

Like it says in my favorite song from WITB, from Vol 10 during the credits, "...and I get to share your invitation, with everybody, with everybody I meet."

RickKatrinaOwens
RickKatrinaOwens

I'm going to have to say ABSOLUTELY NOT! There is really no way that a real Christian (I'm saying true follower, not just a fan of Jesus,) can justify allowing our kids to celebrate this day. Oh sure, we are under the impression that we can "take things back from satan," give it a new name and we're all good, but the truth is, if we really read our Bible and believed what the Word says, this would not even be an issue among true believers. Take it from a family who allowed this celebration to happen when our oldest was young, and now ask us why we are having to ask God to save our son from the clutches of the world (after all, he saw the church celebrating worldly things, so now, he believes that if it's OK for Christians, then it MUST be OK for him... love and mercy right?)

You as a parent have one shot to get it right. DO NOT deceive yourselves or allow the enemy into deceiving you. You can say that we can't live in a bubble, but believe me, if we could go back and do it over again, we'd have the biggest bubble on the block. 

Halloween is NOT an innocent day. There is a REAL SPIRITUAL battle raging for the hearts and minds of your kids. Remember, no one wanted to listen to the prophets and look what happened. God will not be mocked and He demands 100% of us. Lukewarm gets spewed out of His mouth.

The kids will be just fine if you say no to this one day.. No is a word that we neglect too often as parents.

I love and care for you all... say what you will, justify all you want, but we have been there and will never be again.

Patricia Louis
Patricia Louis

When I was growing up my parents taught us about Halloween is a celebration which originated with the Druids ,an order of priests and sorcerers in ancient Europe .The Druids worshiped the natural and supernatural worlds.According to their Celtic calendar , October 31st was the last day of the year_New Year's Eve.On this day, they held the festival called Samhain which marked the start of winter and honored Samana, the Lord of Death. Christians Have No Business Participating In Halloween . Because we have for so long believed Halloween to be an innocent season of fun, too many of our children have been made vulnerable to a spirit of fear and to the occult. Simply put.halloween is a day that honors and glorifies satan. From the beginning, people have believed that Halloween was the time when invisible spirits were closer than at any other time of the year.People believed that evil spirits could help them predict the future.Many of the Halloween activities practiced today were originally used as methods of divination [Jeremiah 27:9;Galatians 5 : 19-21] Here are some examples of satanically inspired rituals that have become an accepted part of our innocent Halloween tradition . Bobbing for apples. Broomsticks: Black cats: Costumes:traced back to 18th century Britain. Groups of merry- makers would roam the streets dressed in masks and clothing of the opposite sex to play tricks on neighbors. Jack-O-Lanterns: Traced back to Irish folk tale of a man named Jack, to whom the devil supposedly appeared wanting to claim his soul. Because of his sins, jack was barred from heaven. However,he was not allowed into hell because he played two tricks on the devil. So jack persuaded the satan to give him a lighted coal to guide him in the dark.Jack put the coal in a pumpkin and was condemned to walk the earth with his lantern. It doesn't really matter whether you believe this silly story or not . What the story stands for and the origin of putting candles in pumpkins is evil and gives honor to the devil. Thus, Halloween is a day in which virtually everything that God has called an abomination is glorified.That is why Christians have no business participating in Halloween! GOD'S WORD GIVES US CLEAR INSTRUCTIONS: Abstain from all appearances of evil. 1Thessalonians 5:22 Neither give place to the devil . Ephesians 4:27 Your adversary, the devil as a roaring lion, walketh about seeking whom he may devour. 1 Peter 5: 8 For this purpose the Son of God was manifested : that He might destroy the works of the devil. 1 John 3 :8 . CHOOSE THIS DAY WHOM YOU WILL SERVE Joshua 24 :15.

Kathy Gabbard Foust
Kathy Gabbard Foust

We do not do Halloween.just leave a bowl of candy on a chair at my front door.for the little ones.

NextMasterChef
NextMasterChef

Sarah Mae's take is perfect!  Everybody has their own convictions that they are given and as long as they are being obedient to those convictions, then you're doing right.  

KimberlyBaltzley
KimberlyBaltzley

Our family approaches it the way Amanda from ohamanda.com approaches it. Thank you for this great conversation! 

Jenn @ A Simple Haven
Jenn @ A Simple Haven

Love Sarah Mae's take on this--ask the Lord what's best for your family, go forth in confidence, and graciously allow for the different convictions of others.

mrsbrownkiwi
mrsbrownkiwi

@sarahmae Love yr thghts.In our 4 &half yrs in states the how do we handle Halloween qn was by far hardest thing, culturally we dealt with.

wendycwood
wendycwood

@sarahmae We've evolved a 180 on this subject. I figure, I'm no more "celebrating Satan" in Oct, than my pagan friend is Jesus in December.

manenough
manenough

"Woe to those who call evil good and good evil" Isaiah 5:20

Halloween celebration is evil. We should condemn evil when we see one. We do it out of love for the other person who thinks that it is ok. Some people misinterpreted it as an attack against the person when the bottom-line is to point out the wrong belief.

KristyStinnette
KristyStinnette

@AmandaHarrisonCruz Amen!! Amen!! I shared my own convictions above but I tried very hard not to criticize anyone, which completely negates all that we as Christians are suppose to stand for.

John 8:7 - But when they persisted in asking Him, He straightened up, and, said to them, "He who is without sin among you, let him be the first to throw a stone at her." (NASB)

Matthew 23:4 - They tie up heavy, cumbersome loads and put them on other people's shoulder's but they themselves are not willing to lift a finger to move them.


manenough
manenough

@FarmerFriend

So called Christians should do things what is right in the eyes of God and not what is right in their eyes. In the eyes of God, Halloween celebration is an abomination. 

manenough
manenough

The Bible is very specific on what days that can be celebrated in His honor and these days are according to the biblical calendar which is very different from the Gregorian calendar (Roman Catholic calendar) which is the one that we are using. Celebrating even the Reformation Day with the best intentions is still wrong when it is not commanded by Godto be celebrated.

Carrine
Carrine

Also, November 1st is All Saints Day. Luther 's 95 Theses were primarily arguing against the sale of indulgences which were essentially a way to guarantee your loved ones escaped from Purgatory into Heaven. It was believed that the souls were freed from Purgatory on All Saints Day. Therefore, on All Hollows Eve (the day before All Saints Day), Luther posted his protest to what he believed was a harmful practice. And that is why October 31st is soooo important for us as Christians. God moved on that Halloween Day in an amazing way to change the course if Western history in remarkable ways and bring many, many more individuals of every tribe, tongue, people and nation out of darkness and into the marvelous life of salvation by grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone!

jamie at WITB
jamie at WITB

@Mark Helotie Hi Mark, a lot of churches have fall festivals and encourage costumes.

RickKatrinaOwens
RickKatrinaOwens

@lvkimble You make a very valid point, but Jesus will say that. Just look at what He told the churches in Revelation 2 (especially the church in Thyatira,) you did good... BUT I have something against you. "YOU TOLERATED...

sarahmae
sarahmae

@wendycwood I hear you. I figure my views on many things will evolve over time...always before God, doing the best we can.

AmandaHarrisonCruz
AmandaHarrisonCruz

@manenough Absolutely agree with what you have said here.  My ONLY qualm was the name calling.  I can't speak for everyone, but I know that when someone comes to me to point out to me some sin they can see I am struggling with, my reaction to someone saying, "Sister, I love you but I see (fill in the blank) in your life...." is going to be MUCH more gracious than if someone is coming at me saying, "Look here, you good for nothing hypocrite".  Does that make sense?

I am not by any means condoning this holiday, defending its celebration, etc.  I am literally saying that even if we know that we know that we know that something one of our brothers or sisters in Christ is doing is grieving the Lord, we are still supposed to love them.  Point it out to them, yes.  IN LOVE.  Pray for them, yes.  IN LOVE.  And you can't call anybody a name in love.

wendycwood
wendycwood

@sarahmae a lot of perspectives changed when the kids got older and it was obvious they had their own convictions and thought processes.

wendycwood
wendycwood

@sarahmae We were "spiritually raised" in a very fundamental sect of Christianity. We're "undoing" a lot of things we used to adhere to.